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Health Systems Institute
Georgia Institute of Technology
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Research

Publications

The following is a list of publications produced by HSI related faculty and students. The link for each paper leads you to the citation, keyword, and abstract. For copies of the full papers, please use standard methods for obtaining academic publications, such as online library searches.

Multimodal feedback: Establishing a performance baseline for improved access by individuals with visual impairments

Authors: J. Jacko, V. K. Emery, H. S. Vitense

July 2002

Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Assistive Technologies

Abstract: Multimodal interfaces have the potential to enhance a user's overall performance, especially when one perceptual channel, such as vision, is compromised. This research investigated how unimodal, bimodal, and trimodal feedback affected the performance of fully sighted users. Limited research exists that investigates how fully sighted users react to multimodal feedback forms, and to-date even less research is available that has investigated how users with visual impairments respond to multiple forms of feedback. A complex direct manipulation task, consisting of a series search and selection drag-and-drop subtasks, was evaluated in this study. The multiple forms of feedback investigated were auditory, haptic and visual. Each form of feedback was tested alone and in combination. User performance was assessed through measures of workload time. Workload was measured objectively and subjectively, through the physiological measure of pupil diameter and a portion of the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) workload survey, respectively. Time was captured by a measure of how long it took to complete a particular element of the task. The results demonstrate that multimodal feedback improves the performance of fully sighted users and offers great potential to users with visual impairments. As a result, this study serves as a baseline to drive the research and development of effective feedback combinations to enhance performance for individuals with visual impairments.

Citation: Vitense, H. S., Jacko, J. A., & Emery, V. K. (2002) Multimodal feedback: Establishing a performance baseline for improved access by individuals with visual impairments. Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Assistive Technologies, Edinburgh, July 8-10, 49-56.

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