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FAQ

»How do I become involved with the Healthcare Robotics Lab?

The answer depends on who you are. The answers below focus on academics.

If you are already here at Georgia Tech:
If you are an undergraduate at Georgia Tech, and are excited to get started in robotics, send an email to the first author of the latest paper from the project that you are interested in. Expect a reply within 1-2 days, if this does not happen, don't hesitate to bug the other authors and/or Charlie.

If you are a graduate student, postdoc, or faculty interested in collaborating please send inquiries to Charlie or the most relevant student.

In all cases, we ask that you be somewhat informed on what we do before contacting us. In your email, let us know what you are interested in, your background, and a little information about yourself (i.e. how and/or why you got into robotics). If you want to be really awesome, put "I <blank> robots", where blank is a word or phrase of your choice, into the subject line.

If you are not at Georgia Tech:
If you are interested in graduate school. You should apply for admission into one of the schools participating in the Robotics PhD program (BME, IC, CS, ECE, ME, or AE). The Healthcare Robotics Lab is an interdisciplinary lab with students from multiple units, and the new Robotics PhD is the first truly interdisciplinary PhD program devoted to robotics. BME students are especially welcome.

If you are an undergraduate elsewhere, consider applying for an internship through a summer research program such as the SURE program or REU's.

If you are looking for a postdoc, feel free to make contact.

If you are faculty please feel free to contact Charlie. Our most successful collaborations so far have centered around funding opportunities that match with a mutual research interest, so it's great to have funding possibilities in mind.

»I sent an email but haven't heard anything back?

If you are a student, and have not been admitted to Georgia Tech, yet, you may not get a response, since we are focused on admitted students. Otherwise, you should know that Charlie Kemp is notoriously bad at responding to email. His inbox is a vast wasteland. It's almost certainly nothing personal. Persistence can pay off, including multiple emails, stopping by the lab, and making contact with his students.